dias May 22, 2014 at 16:30 Dynamical mass generation by gauge flavor dynamics by Jiří Hošek (NPI) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 15:40 Dark matter searches and astrophysical neutrinos in IceCube by Jason Koskinen (NBI) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 14:20 Theta dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories by Ettore Vicari (Pisa) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 13:30 Constraints on matter from asymptotic safety by Roberto Percacci (SISSA) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 11:10 Chiral symmetry and Quarkyonic vs. Superfluid/Color-Supercondor phases in SU(N) gauge theories at high density by Terry Tomboulis (UCLA) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 10:20 On massive gauge theories beyond perturbation theory by Pilar Hernández Gamazo (Valencia) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 22, 2014 at 9:00 Exploring the Universe at the highest energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory by Karl-Heinz Kampert (Wuppertal) MASS 2014 Talks Thursday May 22, 2014 Much progress has been made in observations of the most energetic particles in Nature but major puzzles remain to be solved. In particular, a flux suppression of cosmic rays has been observed above 5x10^19 eV, such as expected from photo-pion production by protons propagating through the CMB (GZK-effect). However, data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the worlds largest cosmic ray observatory located in Argentina, show a shift towards heavier primary particles above 5x10^18 eV and suggest seeing the maximum energy of cosmic particle accelerators rather than energy losses by propagation effects. We shall review the experimental data and discuss its consequences. Observing particles up to 10^20 eV enable tests also of particle and of fundamental physics, such as features of hadronic interaction at energies up to sqrt(s)=100 TeV, as well as tests Lorentz invariance and smoothness of space-time structure. We shall end the presentation by outlining plans for the near-term future and discussing the prospects and future challenges of UHECR physics. [/flvcp3] We discuss the simplest non-perturbative formulation of a massive SU(2) gauge theory on the lattice, which is equivalent to a non-linear chiral model. We search for lines of constant physics and find a scaling region where both a triplet vector and singlet scalar remain light. We discuss the structure of the effective theory describing the dynamics of these light degrees of freedom. [/flvcp3] The regime of (asymptotically) high quark chemical potential $\mu$ is of great physical interest; arguments over many years have suggested the possibility of superfluidity or color superconductivity phases in this region of the phase diagram. This large $\mu$ regime, however, has been largely inaccessible to direct numerical simulation due to the complex fermion determinant problem. Even in the case of theories with real determinant, such as two-color QCD, MC simulations with light fermions appear at least an order of magnitude more challenging than at zero density. In recent years concrete results have been obtained on the lattice starting from the strong coupling end by a combination of simulations in special partition function representations, sophisticated mean field analysis, and simulations in two-color QCD. Recently, cluster expansions shown to converge at large $\mu$ have produce definitive results at strong coupling. After reviewing these results we will show how the cluster expansion method can be extended to all gauge couplings in the case of theories with real determinant and discuss the resulting physical picture. [/flvcp3] The existence of a nontrivial fixed point with finitely many relevant directions is a sufficient condition for an UV complete and predictive QFT. There is evidence for the existence of such a fixed point for pure gravity. I will discuss constraints on the number of scalar, fermion and vector fields minimally coupled to gravity, arising from the existence of the fixed point. [/flvcp3] The dependence of 4D SU(N) gauge theories on the topological theta term is discussed at zero and finite temperature, in particular in the large-N limit. General arguments and numerical analyses (exploiting the lattice formulation) show that the theta dependence drastically changes across the deconfinement transition. The low-T phase is characterized by a large-N scaling with theta/N as relevant variable, while in the high-T phase the scaling variable is just theta and the free energy is essentially determined by the instanton-gas approximation. [/flvcp3] Abstract: The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole includes a cubic kilometer of instrumented ice which serves as a unique telescope for exploring the cosmos. The physics portfolio of the project covers searches for neutrino emission from the annihilation of dark matter and the observation of astrophysical neutrinos and searches for their possible sources. I will cover the most recent dark matter results in addition to the IceCube astrophysical neutrino results. I will conclude with prospects for next generation detector upgrades that will improve sensitivity at the both the O(1) GeV and > O(100) TeV energies. [/flvcp3] See arXiv:1401.7503. [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 16:30 Scale invariant extensions of the SM with strongly interacting hidden sector by Pyungwon Ko (KIAS) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 15:40 Progress towards an a-theorem by Ian Jack (Liverpool) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 14:20 Exact Scale Breaking and Novel Higgs Potentials by Steven Abel (Durham IPPP) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 13:30 Axion-like Particles from Strings by Andreas Ringwald (DESY) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 11:10 Conformal Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and implications for neutrinos and dark matter by Manfred Lindner (MPI, Heidelberg) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 10:20 WISPy Cold Dark Matter by Joerg Jaeckel (Heidelberg) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 21, 2014 at 9:00 Shedding light on (WIMP) dark matter with LUX by Henrique Araujo (Imperial College London) MASS 2014 Talks Wednesday May 21, 2014 The Large Underground Xenon experiment is searching for interactions of galactic dark matter particles in a 250 kg liquid xenon target. LUX features a double-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber at its core, and operates in a low background environment at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, South Dakota, USA. Results from its first science run completed in 2013 put new constraints on the elastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) off nucleons. Very low energy threshold for nuclear recoil detection and novel calibration techniques have allowed a 20-fold improvement in sensitivity for low mass WIMPs relative to the previous leading experiment, changing the landscape of direct searches for light WIMPs. The null result from LUX can only be reconciled with controversial signal claims by other experiments under the most contrived set of astrophysical, particle physics and experimental assumptions. I will describe the experiment and this significant result, and discuss future prospects as LUX enters a longer science run in 2014. [/flvcp3] Very light bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe are an intriguing possibility for the cold dark matter of the Universe. Particularly interesting candidates are axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons. This talk will discuss the current status of such light dark matter with a particular emphasis towards opportunities for its detection. [/flvcp3] New ideas about the role of conformal symmetry for electro-weak symmetry breaking will be discussed in general and some models will be described in detail. Some interesting implications for neutrino physics and dark matter will also be discussed. [/flvcp3] There are various puzzling astrophysical and cosmological phenomena which may be explained by the existence of light axion-like particles (ALPs) with a tiny coupling to two photons. For example, the anomalous transparency of the universe for gamma rays may be explained by oscillations of photons into sub-microeV mass ALPs (and vice versa) in ambient magnetic fields and a recently found unidentified X-ray line may arise from the two photon decay of a keV mass ALP comprising a part or even the total of dark matter. In this talk, we will discuss how such ALPs may arise naturally from strings. [/flvcp3] We present a gauge mediation principle for theories where exact UV scale invariance is broken in a hidden sector. The relevant configurations are those in which the visible sector and a hidden sector emanate from a scale invariant pair of UV theories that communicate only via gauge interactions. We compute the relevant operators of the Higgs sector (which arise at two and three loops). The potential contains logarithmic mass-squared terms which lead to three different low energy configurations. In the first the Higgs sector is the same as that of the usual Standard Model, with the negative Higgs mass-squared arising naturally from radiative corrections. The second has dominant logarithmic mass-squared terms for the Higgs, allowing the electroweak symmetry breaking minimum to be at zero vacuum energy or metastable. In the third configuration the effective potential has negligible quartic term, and yet electroweak symmetry is broken radiatively by a "running-Higgs-mass-squared". The phenomenology of the two new configurations is identical to that of the Standard Model, except for the Higgs self-couplings which are substantially different. [/flvcp3] We discuss recent progress towards an a-theorem governing renormalisation-group flow in four-dimensional quantum field theories, focussing on explicit perturbative results. We also discuss the evidence for an explicit all-orders a-function in supersymmetric theories. [/flvcp3] [/flvcp3]
dias May 20, 2014 at 11:10 Compositeness and Lattice Strong Dynamics by Pavlos M. Vranas (LLNL) MASS 2014 Talks Tuesday May 20, 2014 Neutrinos may be Majorana particles. If so, neutrino less double beta decay processes could be observed by the next generation of bb0nu experiments. I will briefly review the state of the art, then discuss one of the most promising ideas in the field, the use of Hight Pressure Gas Xenon TPC (HPGXe) with electroluminescence gain and optical readout. A 100 kg incarnation of such a device will start operations at the Canfranc Underground Lab in Spain in 2015. The technology can be extrapolated to 1 ton, and thus lead the exploration of the inverse hierarchy in Majorana landscape. [/flvcp3] With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at the LHC we are leaving through a unique time in which unprecedented experimental means and expertise are matched by the results of decades of theoretical efforts to provide the most accurate description of collider data. The evidence for this new particle has given us some crucial hints to understand the nature of the electroweak interactions, and the accurate determination of its properties could provide further indirect evidence of new physics. In this talk I will review some of the theoretical developments that have played a crucial role in the discovery of a Higgs boson and will be essential in measuring its properties. [/flvcp3] Dark matter may be composite, made up of electroweak charged constituents, bound by a new strong force so that the composite particle is neutral and has diminishingly small interactions with ordinary matter. In addition, the breaking of electroweak symmetry and the emergence of the Higgs particle may be the result of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of a new underlying strongly interacting theory. These can be gauge theories with certain number of colors, flavors and fermion representations. In that case, their strong dynamics can be studied using Lattice Gauge Theory methods very much like Lattice QCD. Here I will present lattice simulation results from the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on possible composite dark matter models and the associated experimental exclusions, as well as results on conformality and compositeness for strongly interacting theories of electroweak symmetry breaking. [/flvcp3]
dias May 20, 2014 at 10:20 Higgs-boson phenomenology: from discovery to precision physics by Laura Reina (Florida) MASS 2014 Talks Tuesday May 20, 2014 Neutrinos may be Majorana particles. If so, neutrino less double beta decay processes could be observed by the next generation of bb0nu experiments. I will briefly review the state of the art, then discuss one of the most promising ideas in the field, the use of Hight Pressure Gas Xenon TPC (HPGXe) with electroluminescence gain and optical readout. A 100 kg incarnation of such a device will start operations at the Canfranc Underground Lab in Spain in 2015. The technology can be extrapolated to 1 ton, and thus lead the exploration of the inverse hierarchy in Majorana landscape. [/flvcp3] With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at the LHC we are leaving through a unique time in which unprecedented experimental means and expertise are matched by the results of decades of theoretical efforts to provide the most accurate description of collider data. The evidence for this new particle has given us some crucial hints to understand the nature of the electroweak interactions, and the accurate determination of its properties could provide further indirect evidence of new physics. In this talk I will review some of the theoretical developments that have played a crucial role in the discovery of a Higgs boson and will be essential in measuring its properties. [/flvcp3] Dark matter may be composite, made up of electroweak charged constituents, bound by a new strong force so that the composite particle is neutral and has diminishingly small interactions with ordinary matter. In addition, the breaking of electroweak symmetry and the emergence of the Higgs particle may be the result of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of a new underlying strongly interacting theory. These can be gauge theories with certain number of colors, flavors and fermion representations. In that case, their strong dynamics can be studied using Lattice Gauge Theory methods very much like Lattice QCD. Here I will present lattice simulation results from the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on possible composite dark matter models and the associated experimental exclusions, as well as results on conformality and compositeness for strongly interacting theories of electroweak symmetry breaking. [/flvcp3]
dias May 20, 2014 at 9:00 The @next neutrinoless double beta decay experiment by Juan José Gómez-Cadenas (IFIC (CSIC & UVEG)) MASS 2014 Talks Tuesday May 20, 2014 Neutrinos may be Majorana particles. If so, neutrino less double beta decay processes could be observed by the next generation of bb0nu experiments. I will briefly review the state of the art, then discuss one of the most promising ideas in the field, the use of Hight Pressure Gas Xenon TPC (HPGXe) with electroluminescence gain and optical readout. A 100 kg incarnation of such a device will start operations at the Canfranc Underground Lab in Spain in 2015. The technology can be extrapolated to 1 ton, and thus lead the exploration of the inverse hierarchy in Majorana landscape. [/flvcp3] With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at the LHC we are leaving through a unique time in which unprecedented experimental means and expertise are matched by the results of decades of theoretical efforts to provide the most accurate description of collider data. The evidence for this new particle has given us some crucial hints to understand the nature of the electroweak interactions, and the accurate determination of its properties could provide further indirect evidence of new physics. In this talk I will review some of the theoretical developments that have played a crucial role in the discovery of a Higgs boson and will be essential in measuring its properties. [/flvcp3] Dark matter may be composite, made up of electroweak charged constituents, bound by a new strong force so that the composite particle is neutral and has diminishingly small interactions with ordinary matter. In addition, the breaking of electroweak symmetry and the emergence of the Higgs particle may be the result of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of a new underlying strongly interacting theory. These can be gauge theories with certain number of colors, flavors and fermion representations. In that case, their strong dynamics can be studied using Lattice Gauge Theory methods very much like Lattice QCD. Here I will present lattice simulation results from the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on possible composite dark matter models and the associated experimental exclusions, as well as results on conformality and compositeness for strongly interacting theories of electroweak symmetry breaking. [/flvcp3]
dias May 19, 2014 at 16:30 Lattice Radial Quantization by George T. Fleming (Yale University) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias May 19, 2014 at 15:40 Non-perturbative propagators and running coupling in the conformal window of QCD by Reinhard Alkofer (Graz) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias May 19, 2014 at 14:20 From lowe energy neutrino data to mass models (and back) with leptogenesis. by Pasquale Di Bari (Southampton) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias May 19, 2014 at 11:10 Right-Handed Neutrinos as the Origin of the Electroweak Scale by Hooman Davoudiasl (BNL) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias May 19, 2014 at 10:20 Mass and Lattice QCD by Laurent Lellouch (CPT Marseille, CNRS & Aix-Marseille U) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias May 19, 2014 at 9:00 Present and Future of axion searches: the International AXion Observatory IAXO by Igor G. Irastorza (Zaragoza) MASS 2014 Talks Monday May 19, 2014 Axions are a natural consequence of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, the most compelling solution to the strong-CP problem. Similar axion-like particles (ALPs) also appear in a number of possible extensions of the Standard Model, notably in string theories. Both axions and ALPs are very well motivated candidates for the Dark Matter, and are subject of increasing interest by experimentalists. I will present the different experimental strategies to detect these particles, and I will briefly review their current status and future prospects. Then I will focus on the International Axion Observatory (IAXO), the most ambitious project currently under consideration. IAXO will be a fourth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or ALPs originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal to background ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, the most sensitive axion helioscope to- date. IAXO has also potential to host additional detection setups. Most interestingly, the large magnetic volume of IAXO could be used to detect relic axion or ALPs potentially composing the galactic halo of Dark Matter. IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. [/flvcp3] While elementary particles get their mass from a Higgs-like mechanism, the origin of the mass of ordinary matter is non-perturbative, strong interaction dynamics. This has been unambiguously confirmed in the last few years, thanks to the tremendous progress undergone by ab-initio calculations in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). After reviewing this progress, I will show how lattice QCD is allowing us to investigate many different aspects of mass. These applications range from providing the theory required to "measure" quark masses, to explaining important aspects of the stability of ordinary matter, through determining the coupling of possible WIMP dark matter, which could constitute 85% of the total matter in the universe, to the ordinary matter of WIMP detectors. [/flvcp3] The insular nature of the Standard Model may be explained if the Higgs potential is only sensitive to quantum corrections from masses associated with physical states. Starting from a scale-free electroweak sector, we show that heavy right-handed neutrinos can be the origin of mass for scalar dark matter, in a framework with two scalar doublets. In turn, below the mass of heavy neutrinos, the dark matter sector sets the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. The successive transmission of mass scale from right-handed neutrinos occurs at the quantum level. This framework includes all the necessary ingredients to provide a viable dark matter candidate, realistic light neutrino masses, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via thermal leptogenesis. [/flvcp3] Do interacting UV fixed points exist, and if so, what can we do with them? The talk by Daniel Litim (Sussex) will be available later. I will discuss how imposing the successful leptogenesis bound one obtains interesting constraints on those high energy parameters characterising right-handed (RH) neutrino parameters in the see-saw mechanism. This provides a useful guidance among the many existing models especially when a condition of independence of the initial conditions is further added (strong thermal leptogenesis condition). In this case a particular (hierarchical) RH neutrino mass spectrum is singled out that, interestingly, is realised in SO(10)-inspired models. I will also discuss how the strong thermal leptogenesis condition by itself (i.e. model independently) favours values of the absolute neutrino mass scale that imply deviations from the hierarchical limit that might be experimentally detected in absolute neutrino mass scale experiments, especially in the case of normally ordered light neutrinos. In this way, leptogenesis acts as an important tool to connect low energy neutrino data to models. [/flvcp3] QCD with a relatively large number of fundamentally charged quark flavours in the chiral limit is considered. A self-consistent solution of the quark, gluon and ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge exhibits a phase transition. Above the critical number of fermion flavours the non-perturbative running coupling develops a plateau over a wide momentum range, and the propagators follow a power law behaviour for these momenta. Hereby, the critical number of quark flavours depends crucially on the non-perturbative tensor structures of the quark-gluon vertex. [/flvcp3] I present the current status of a program to formulate D-dimensional strongly-coupled relativistic quantum field theories on lattice discretizations of cylindrical manifolds whose cross-section is a (D-1)-dimensional sphere. Critical points in such theories should correspond to Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) if the full rotational symmetry of the sphere can be recovered in the continuum limit. If the formulation is successful, studying these CFTs should be numerically much less expensive that the equivalent calculations on a D-dimensional torus. [/flvcp3] Conformal bootstrap in 4D The talk by Oleg Antipin (INFN) will be available later.
dias September 16, 2013 New Physics from vector-like Technicolor: new opportunities for astrophysics and collider phenomenology by Roman Pasechnik (Lund University) I will discuss a new microscopic model for high-scale strongly-coupled dynamics in its simplest possible formulation based upon a single vector-like $SU(2)_{\rm W}$ T-quark doublet (with hypercharge $Y_Q=0$) confined under the minimal $SU(2)_{\rm TC}$ (in principle, any even) T-color group. Besides it naturally avoids stringent EW constraints at the fundamental level and may explain possible (small) deviations in Higgs couplings, it provides dynamical EW symmetry breaking via an effective Higgs mechanism. I will outline interesting theoretical and phenomenological opportunities related with lightest physical T-pion, T-sigma and T-baryon states in the considering scenario. In particular, I will illustrate why an odd QCD-like $SU(2n+1)_{TC}$ group of confinement has been excluded by XENON100 data on spin-independent Dark Matter cross section if the T-baryon number is conserved. Scalar T-baryon Dark Matter in the simplest even $SU(2)_{TC}$ group offers a prominent way out and distinctive collider signatures. Possible ways to construct the composite Higgs doublets in the vector-like Technicolor will be discussed. Finally, extra hybrid (bi-fundamental) color-T-color representations give rise to partial neutrino compositeness and effective see-saw mechanism for small neutrino mass generation in a natural way.
dias November 2, 2010 at 16:00 Black Holes in Elementary Physics by Gerard ‘t Hooft (Utrecht University) Abstract In Physics, black holes are known as extremely dense forms of matter, of which, from the outside, only the gravitational force can be detected. Astronomers observe such object ate various spots in the Universe. When in laboratories on earth elementary particles are made to collide with the strongest possible force, these collisions are by far not energetic enough to produce black holes. However, we can try to imagine collisions that are so energetic that black holes do form, and then ask ourselves what exactly might happen then. The question is important because it turns out that our theoretical understanding falls short at this point. The gravitational force is so special that all beautiful theories we have today about the particles and the forces between them cannot describe it. Do black holes obey the laws of quantum mechanics? Are black holes also subatomic particles and vice versa? If so, our theories must be revised. This can lead to fundamental new insights about very basic features in physics, and give us new tools to describe space, time, and matter. Professor Gerard 't Hooft Professor Gerard 't Hooft is a theoretical physicist at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. He shared the 1999 Nobel Prize in Physics with Martinus J. G. Veltman for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions. He was awarded the Lorentz Medal in 1986 and the Spinozapremie in 1995. Public Lecture Prof. 't Hooft gives a lecture on Black Holes in Elementary Physics. The lecture is intended for the general public. Everybody is welcome to attend. You do not need to register for the lecture, and entrance is free. Refreshments will be served before the lecture. More Information The Nobel Lecture is held together with the 3rd Odense Winter School on Geometry and Theoretical Physics - look at the home page of the winter school for travel information, accommodation, etc. Poster A PDF version of our poster can be found by following this link. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 16:00 QCD and Event Generators by Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 15:30 The proton-proton cross-section from low to LHC energies by Finn Ravndal (Oslo) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 14:30 LHC and Beyond by Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 14:00 String Theory and Particle Physics by Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 11:30 Light-Front Holography - A New Approximation to QCD by Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 11:00 The Structure of the Hadrons by Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 10:30 Introduction to CP3-Origins by Francesco Sannino (CP3-Origins) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias November 24, 2009 at 10:15 Danish National Research Foundation by Klaus Bock (DNRF) We are pleased to announce the formal Inauguration of the first danish Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics Phenomenology dedicated to the understanding of the origin of mass in the Universe, CP³-Origins hosted by the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The Centre has been established by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). Here you can download the poster and here the detailed program. Key note speakers Klaus Bock (DNRF) Stanley J. Brodsky (SLAC/Stanford) Paolo Di Vecchia (NORDITA) Paul Hoyer (Helsinki) Michelangelo L. Mangano (CERN) Henrik Pedersen (SDU) Finn Ravndal (Oslo) Francesco Sannino (CP³-Origins) Torbjörn Sjöstrand (Lund) [gallery link="file" columns="2"] The event will take place on Tuesday the 24th of November 2009 in Auditorium 100 of the University of Southern Denmark. The meeting starts at 10 AM. After the opening speeches by the Dean of the University of Southern Denmark, the Chair of the Danish National Research Foundation, and the presentation of the Centre by the Director, world renowned scientists will discuss the present and future of high energy physics. The scientific lectures will be short and at a beginning graduate studies level in physics. Besides marking the start of the new centre of excellence, the inauguration provides a unique opportunity to learn about our current understanding of the Universe and how we plan to get a step closer to unveiling some of its still unsolved mysteries such as the origin of bright and dark mass in the universe. The inauguration will be followed by an intense scientific program with a Workshop on the Origins of Mass problem on the 25th of November and a Winter School in Geometry and Theoretical Physics on the 26th and 27th of November. Media
dias October 26, 2009 Topology and the Universe by Berian James (DARK, Copenhagen) In recent decades, astronomical observations have led to a broad, if incomplete, consensus description of the large-scale Universe: its evolution is determined by a handful of substances ('usual' matter like atoms, stars and galaxies; a hidden, but gravitationally attractive dark matter; the poorly understood and unfortunately named dark energy) all of which are changing under the influence of physical laws. In the region of the Universe visible to astronomers, great cosmological structures are observed---dense clusters in which the majority of galaxies form; vast and apparently empty voids; and a tangle of filaments that has been coined 'the cosmic web'. In this talk, I explore the role that topology, the mathematics of shape, plays in defining our understanding of the Universe. After reviewing the relationship between geometry and dynamics that characterises the modern Big Bang theory, I discuss three topics of broad scope: i) the classification of cosmological structures as a means of understanding both the physics of the very early Universe and the evolution and formation of galaxies; ii) the impact of some modern mathematical results from differential geometry that have yet to be fully assimilated into physics; and iii) the theory and measurements of the global topology of the Universe---does it extend infinitely in all directions, or wrap-around on itself, and how can we tell? Due to technical reasons the first few minutes of the talk are unfortunately missing from the recording.