Two new post docs: Vignaroli and Janowski

September 2, 2015

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Natascia Vignaroli and Tadeusz Janowski

On September 7, Natascia Vignaroli starts as a postdoc at CP³-Origins, and on September 15, Tadeusz Janowski will join us as well.

Natascia earned her BSc in 2006 and her MSc in 2008 from the University of Rome “La Sapienza.” She received her Ph.D. from University of Rome “La Sapienza” in February 2012 with a thesis examining the “Phenomenology of heavy fermion and vector resonances in composite Higgs models” conducted under the supervision of Roberto Contino. From Oct 2011 to Sept 2012 she worked as postdoc at Iowa State University and from Sept 2012 to Sept 2015 as postdoc at Michigan State University.
Her research interests focus mainly on the phenomenology of Beyond-the-Standard-Model strong dynamics (Composite Higgs Models / Randall-Sundrum), with emphasis on the search for new physics at colliders. She is also interested in the study of the flavour structure of BSM theories and in developing new techniques to extract information on the Higgs sector.

Tadeusz finished his PhD at Southampton University in September 2015 with a thesis entitled “Hadronic kaon decays from lattice QCD” under the supervision of Prof. Chris Sachrajda.
The focus of his studies was on kaon physics, especially hadronic kaon decays into two pions, using lattice QCD. This process is interesting, because it is sensitive to different sources of CP violation (direct or indirect) in the kaon system. It can also shed light on the experimental observation known as the “Delta I=1/2” rule, which states that these decays are dominated by the channel with pions in an isospin zero state, which, until recently, was not very well understood.
He was also involved in calculation of the K-pi scattering lengths, which are important in searches for new physics at low energies.
His current research interests include lattice QCD, flavour physics, CP violation and hadron spectroscopy.